Sync your iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch with iTunes on your computer using USB

With iTunes, you can sync your music, movies, TV shows, photos and more. After you sync, the content on your iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch matches the content in your iTunes Library on your computer.

Before you begin

Before syncing with iTunes, consider using iCloud or similar services to keep your content automatically up to date on all of your devices. Learn more about your other options.

If you prefer to use iTunes to sync your content, follow the steps below to set up syncing in iTunes using USB.

What you can sync with iTunes

  • Albums, songs, playlists, movies, TV shows, books, podcasts, audiobooks, and tones.
  • Photos and videos. To sync photos and videos using iTunes, you can use a supported photos app or sync from a specific folder on your computer. Learn more about how to keep your photos and videos up to date on all of your devices.
  • Contacts and calendars.
  • Device backups that you made using iTunes.

iTunes features might vary by country or region.

Sync your content with iTunes

Follow these steps to manually sync the content from your computer to your iOS device:

  1. Open iTunes. Make sure that you have the latest version.
  2. Connect your device to your computer using the included USB cable. Your connected device appears as an icon in the upper-left corner of the iTunes window. Learn what to do if you don’t see the icon.
  3. Click on the device icon . Look under Settings on the left side of the iTunes window for a list of the content types that you can sync from your iTunes library to your device.

    If you don’t have certain content in your iTunes library, you might not see some tabs. For example, if you don’t have any podcasts in your library, you won’t see a Podcast tab.

    iTunes can’t sync certain content, including mail accounts, notes, or bookmarks. Use iCloud to manage your mail, notes, and bookmarks across your devices. Some iOS apps might use iTunes’s File Sharing feature to transfer content instead of syncing.

  4. Click the content type that you want to sync.
  5. In the main iTunes window, click the box next to Sync to turn on syncing for that content type. If there’s a check in the box, syncing for that content type is already on.
    If you see a message that your iOS device is synced with another iTunes library after clicking the box, your iOS device was previously connected to another computer. If you click “Erase and Sync” in that message, all content of the selected type on your iOS device is replaced with content from your computer. Content that you didn’t turn on syncing for isn’t deleted from your iOS device. You can only sync your iOS device with one iTunes library at a time.

    If you use iCloud or other services to keep your content up to date, syncing through iTunes might be disabled.

  6. After you turn on syncing for a content type, you’ll see additional options to customize your sync settings. Use these options to make sure that you’re syncing the content that you want synced.
  7. Repeat steps 4–6 for each content type that you want to sync.
  8. Click the Apply button in the lower-right corner of the screen to save your sync settings. If syncing doesn’t start automatically, click the Sync button.

After you turn on syncing, your content syncs each time that you connect your iOS device to your computer and have iTunes open.

If you see a message that some of your content couldn’t sync, your computer might not be authorized for that type of content. Make sure that your computer is authorized for the content that you’re trying to sync.

Turn off syncing in iTunes

  1. Open iTunes. Make sure that you have the latest version.
  2. Connect your device to your computer using the included USB cable. Your connected device appears as an icon in the upper-left corner of the iTunes window. Learn what to do if you don’t see the icon.
  3. Click on the device icon  .
  4. Under Settings on the left side of the iTunes Window, click the content type for which you want to turn off syncing.
  5. In the main iTunes window, uncheck the box next to Sync. All of that content type removes from your iOS device.
  6. Click the Apply button to save your sync settings.

Learn more

source : apple.com

HTC Desire 650 Review

Introduction

Today, sub-$200 phones aren’t what they used to be, and HTC is proving the point with the good looking, two-tone Desire 650. A successor to the 630, the new entry level device comes with HTC staples like front BoomSound speakers and “hi-res” audio. It also takes an interesting design twist with a half-smooth, half-groove rear cover, but does what’s under the hood perform well enough to warrant a purchase? Let’s find out…

Design

The BoomSound set makes the Desire 650 a bit big for a 5-incher

The Desire 650 exhibits a very HTC-compliant design, with five enormous front openings in the top and bottom bezel indicating there are BoomSound speakers there, and a huge camera lens circle on the back. It is made entirely of plastic, yet is not particularly light or compact for a 5-incher, on account of the sizable top and bottom bezels housing the BoomSound set. The soft-touch rear is grooved at the lower half for better traction and a more interesting look.

Inserting a SIM card, or swapping your microSD when full are easy actions to do on the Desire 650, as there is simply a flap on the left covering both slots, and it is easy to pry open. We liked that the SIM card is hot swappable, so you don’t need to switch off the phone to change it (looking at you, Sony), and the Desire 650 automatically picks the carrier settings and sets the language according to the area.

To see the phones in real size or compare them with other models, visit our Visual Phone Size Comparison page.

Display

You get what you pay for with the Desire 650’s display, which sports credible colors, but is dim and reflective

A 720 x 1280 pixels resolution screen is all you get with the Desire 650, which isn’t surprising given the phone’s price point, and at a 5” diagonal returns good enough pixel density for most tasks. The LCD display offers fairly credible color presentation that doesn’t venture to the cold or warm side too much.

It is rather dim for today’s LCD standards, though, at barely 368 nits of peak brightness, and pretty reflective, so outdoor visibility under direct sunlight is a bit of a struggle. At 12 nits minimum brightness it is hardly comfortable to read on at night, too. The viewing angles also don’t impress, as contrast and color shift significantly when the phone gets tilted, and reflections abound.

Display measurements and quality

  • Screen measurements
  • Color charts

Maximum brightness (nits)Higher is better Minimum brightness (nits)Lower is better Contrast Higher is better Color temperature (Kelvins) Gamma Delta E rgbcmy Lower is better Delta E grayscale Lower is better
HTC Desire 650 361
(Average)
13
(Poor)
1:1559
(Excellent)
6953
(Excellent)
2.3
4.01
(Average)
2.81
(Good)
Motorola Moto M 445
(Good)
7
(Good)
1:1398
(Excellent)
8452
(Poor)
2.24
4.21
(Average)
8.42
(Poor)
HTC Desire 626 476
(Good)
15
(Poor)
1:1414
(Excellent)
6290
(Excellent)
2.46
3.06
(Good)
3.34
(Good)

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Meizu M5 Review

Introduction

If you live in the United States, chances are you’ve never heard of Chinese phone maker Meizu. The company has grown to sell some 22 million phones in 2016, with almost 90% of them sold in China. That ranks it among the bigger phone makers over in the world’s most populous nation, and with that popularity, some enthusiasts who have heard about the brand might wonder: what’s special about Meizu phones? How would they work if you import one to the U.S.? Actually, certain Meizu handsets do end up being sold through some European retailers, but the exposure is patchy at best.

The Meizu M5 that we have up for review here is the company’s most affordable phone: a 5.2 incher with an entry level MediaTek system chip, it still packs the important for security fingerprint scanner and a few other extras.

Join us for our full Meizu M5 review to see whether it’s worth considering for buyers who are willing to experiment with importing a phone from China.

Design

The M5 is made of semi-matte plastic which feels warm and inviting, plus it looks good and does not get smudged with fingerprints.

The Meizu M5 is an affordable phone, and you can tell by its design: it’s an all-plastic body that, depending on the color, might fool you into thinking you are looking at a metal phone from afar. It’s not, but the semi-matte plastic on it feels nice to touch and does not catch annoying fingerprint smudges.

The body itself is neither too thick, nor among the thinnest: it measures 0.31 inches (8 mm) in thickness. The phone is also fairly light-weight at just 4.9 ounces (138 grams).

The right screen and body size for a phone is a subjective matter, but it feels like 5.2 inches is around the golden mean: neither too large, nor too small. This is a nice size that will suit many people.

The fingerprint scanner is a nice extra for such an affordable phone: it is fast and fairly reliable, we had no issues with it.

You should also know that the phone uses a microUSB port for charging, no fancy USB-C port here. And yes, it has a 3.5mm headset jack.

Finally, you have five color options to choose from: mint green, champagne, matte black, glacier white, and sapphire blue, which is more than sufficient variety.

To see the phones in real size or compare them with other models, visit our Visual Phone Size Comparison page.

Display

A 5.2” display with cold, bluish colors that appear slightly washed out. It’s not too bad, but it’s definitely one of the weak points of the phone.

The Meizu M5 sports a 5.2” IPS LCD screen with a resolution of 720 x 1280 pixels.

The screen is usually one of the weakest points in an affordable phone, and the Meizu M5 is no exception. First, there is a noticeable light bleed on the top of the display on our unit (a slight one on the bottom as well). Secondly, colors are on the cold side: whites appear bluish and overall colors are not perfectly balanced. The screen definitely lacks in liveliness, colors look a bit washed out.

Good news is that the screen gets fairly bright (we measured peak brightness of 466 nits) and it’s not too reflective, so it’s reasonably easy to read what’s on the display even on a bright, sunny day.

The 720 x 1280 pixel resolution works out to a pixel density of 282 ppi. What this number means is you can see some slight pixelization and jagged edges here and there. We don’t find this to be a major issue, though (the bluish colors seem like a bigger issue in daily use), but again, something to consider.

We should also note that there is an ambient light sensor – and believe it or not some affordable phones still lack one – that adjusts screen brightness automatically. It is a bit on the slow side and does not gradually adjust the brightness, but instead jumps abruptly from dark to bright. Still, it works, and we’re happy with both how bright, but also how dark the screen can get at night, so that it does not hurt your eyes when you read in bed.

Display measurements and quality

  • Screen measurements
  • Color charts

Maximum brightness (nits)Higher is better Minimum brightness (nits)Lower is better Contrast Higher is better Color temperature (Kelvins) Gamma Delta E rgbcmy Lower is better Delta E grayscale Lower is better
Meizu M5 466
(Good)
2
(Excellent)
1:1104
(Good)
7805
(Average)
1.99
5.45
(Average)
6.22
(Average)
Motorola Moto G4 650
(Excellent)
5
(Excellent)
1:1334
(Excellent)
6915
(Excellent)
2.38
5.38
(Average)
3.42
(Good)
Meizu M3 Note 447
(Good)
4
(Excellent)
1:892
(Average)
7124
(Good)
2.15
4.16
(Average)
5.4
(Average)

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Skagen Hagen Connected Review

Introduction

If you’ve been following smartwatches, you may or may not have heard of this new breed called ‘hybrid watches’. This take on the contemporary smartwatch actually loses much of what makes the smartwatch smart. We’re talking about the screen, the processor, and, in fact, the OS itself. You’ll find none of that in a hybrid watch. So why buy one, then?

Skagen Hagen Connected Review

Hybrid watches aren’t good for checking the weather, or playing Spotify from the wrist. They simply can’t do that. However, they make for great fitness tracking devices, and you know what the best part is? You don’t have to charge them every other day. In fact, a hybrid watch can usually go for months and months on a single charge!

The Fossil Group is where many notable hybrid watch models originate from these days, and one of the newest ones comes from renowned Danish watch maker Skagen.

Named after the lovely Hagen line of watches, the $200 Hagen Connected blends traditional Scandinavian watch design with a number of smart features to give its owner a taste of modern, connected technology. Shall we take a closer look at this baby?

Design

While anoraks may be perfectly happy with touchscreen wearables and watch faces displaying graphics of Iron Man or Mickey Mouse, consumers with at least some sense of style would find themselves thrown off by such designs. This is where hybrid watches like the Hagen Connected come in, as one of their biggest defining features is precisely the lack of screen, and the precense of a good old, real dial, complete with real, moving hands and other traditional elements of classic watches. As Skagen puts it, the Hagen Connected hybrid watch is for people who appreciate good design.

The Hagen Connected is indeed a fine looking timepiece. It has a nicely polished all-stainless steel body, easy to read dials, genuine leather and comfy milanese loop bands… It’s a looker! In fact, it comes in four distinct styles, all of which look beautiful and classy. On the wrist, the leather band feels OK, although its inner edges are a tad sharper than ideal. I haven’t tested the milanese loop band, but expect it to be at least as comfortable, or better.

There’s only one real problem with the Hagen Connected’s design, and that’s how thick it is. The classic, non-smart Hagen is just under 8 mm, which is pretty thin. The Connected, however, is just over 11 mm. It may not sound much, but in reality, and on the wrist, the difference is more than substantial. Probably related to this, the Hagen Connected also feels somewhat hefty, not overly so, but enough to notice it.

All in all, though, the Skagen Hagen Connected is a lovely watch to wear and look at. It has a certain nobility to its styling, certain calmness and maturity, which I can’t help but appreciate.

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Google Pixel vs Samsung Galaxy S7

Introduction

It’s hard to say what was the most important event of the year 2016 in smartphones, but Google’s direct entry in the phone market with its Pixel lineup of phones that replaced the enthusiast-minded Nexus series was certainly one of them.

With the Google Pixel, the search giant is entering the Android phone market that it itself helped establish. And there, it will compete with the big guns, and when it comes to those big boys in town, the Samsung Galaxy S7 is the biggest of them all.

A few months after the launch of the Pixel, we want to share our experience with two of the most accomplished high-end Android phones out there, point out their specific advantages and shortcomings, as well as the little and big differences that might make you choose one over the other.

Design

The glass and metal Galaxy S7 is a statement of style, while the Google Pixel features solid build quality in a more subtle way.

Samsung, a company once criticized for flooding the market with uninspiring plastic phones, has changed tremendously in the past couple of years, and its latest Galaxy S7 is in fact a trend-setter in modern phone design. A beautiful glass sandwich with a metal frame, the S7 has evolved to feature subtle curves that make picking it up from a table and handling it in the hand easier and more pleasant than earlier Samsung phones. Unfortunately, the glass surfaces of the phone are also ones to attracts a ton of fingerprints and glass – as beautiful as it looks – is also prone to shattering, and to costly repairs.

The Google Pixel, on its part, is a surprisingly well-made first-generation device. It features a more practical (meaning less prone to shattering and not getting stained with fingerprints) aluminum body with a distinct glass accent in the top half. Pictures don’t do it full justice: on images it appears a bit thicker than it is in real life, and once you hold it, you appreciate the slight curve around the edges on the back. This makes it much easier to pick up the phone from a table, and just a more comfortable in-hand fit. We also love the heft of the Pixel, it feels just right: the phone is not too light, nor too heavy, very well balanced.

Google Pixel vs Samsung Galaxy S7
Google Pixel vs Samsung Galaxy S7
Google Pixel vs Samsung Galaxy S7

In terms of size, it seems almost as if Samsung and Google copied from the same book: the phones are nearly identical in terms of physical size.

Both phones have a fingerprint scanner: the Galaxy S7 has it on the front, while the Pixel – on its back. If you haven’t used a back-positioned fingerprint scanner before, it definitely takes some getting used to and feels a bit less practical, especially when you want to quickly check something when your phone is lying on a table and you can’t just tap a button, but you have to actually pick up the device to get to that rear-positioned finger scanner.This is much easier with a front fingerprint reader. For all else, both fingerprint scanners are fast, but we find the one on the Pixel more accurate and a bit snappier, as we get misreads a bit too often on the Galaxy S7.

On the bottom, there is a microUSB port on the Galaxy S7 and a USB-C port on the Pixel. The one on the S7 feels decidedly outdated: you have to check the right way to plug in a cable every time, while with USB-C on the Pixel it’s much simpler.

Both phones also sport a good ol’ 3.5mm headset jack and both feature a single, bottom firing speaker that you can easily muffle with your hand when watching videos / listening to music in landscape orientation. Not a big deal, but something to keep in mind.

The S7 also has one cool feature that the Pixel lacks: water protection with an IP68 rating (meaning the phone can be submerged in up to 5 feet of water for up to 30 minutes).

To see the phones in real size or compare them with other models, visit our Visual Phone Size Comparison page.

Display

Two gorgeous AMOLED screens.

The S7 features a 5.1” display, while the Pixel goes with a 5” screen, but in reality the perceived difference is even bigger: on-screen buttons take up some 6.6% of the screen on the Google Pixel, which means that when the on-screen buttons are on (which is most of the time), you will only be able to see 4.67 inches of usable space on the Pixel. The Galaxy S7 uses traditional buttons below the display, so the usable screen space amounts to the full 5.1 inches of the screen.

The Galaxy S7 sports a 1440 x 2560-pixel resolution, while the Pixel runs on a 1080 x 1920-pixel display. Both use a Pentile matrix, and yes, the S7 is the sharper one of the two, but it’s also true that this is a difference that is really hard to notice in real life: at a regular viewing distance, one can hardly notice much of that difference in sharpness.

Both phones use AMOLED technology. This is interesting to see particularly on the Pixel: it shows the way Google sees things going in the future. Samsung is of course manufacturing AMOLED displays, and has been using and improving the technology for years. The advantage of AMOLED is that pixels can be controlled individually: you can turn individual pixels off, which results in perfect blacks and brings excellent contrast rates on the two.

In terms of actual image quality, these are two of the best screens around. Bright and with lively colors, images and video come to life on the two.

The S7 defaults to punchy, slightly overblown colors that many people like. For photography enthusiasts and color perfectionists, the S7 also comes with an sRGB color mode (sRGB is the color standard that is universally accepted globally for pictures and video). You switch to this mode by going into Settings > Display > Color mode > Basic.

The Pixel also defaults to over-saturated colors as Google targets the NTSC color gamut. It’s not perfectly-balanced, but it does look good to the casual observer. If you want a color setting that corresponds to the industry-standard sRGB color gamut, you can switch to it in settings as well.

In terms of brightness, the Galaxy S7 goes up to 484 nits, while the Pixel reaches 398 nits (the higher – the better), but while the S7 has a special mode that boosts that brightness outdoors on a sunny day, the Pixel lacks such a mode, which makes it a bit harder to see in direct sunlight. At night, minimum brightness drops down to 1 nit on the Pixel and 2 nits on the S7. It’s important that phone displays can go to those low levels, as at night even a slight increase in brightness results in eye fatigue and a worse experience.

Display measurements and quality

  • Screen measurements
  • Color charts

Maximum brightness (nits)Higher is better Minimum brightness (nits)Lower is better Contrast Higher is better Color temperature (Kelvins) Gamma Delta E rgbcmy Lower is better Delta E grayscale Lower is better
Google Pixel 398
(Average)
1
(Excellent)
unmeasurable
(Excellent)
7347
(Good)
2.18
6.32
(Average)
4.74
(Average)
Samsung Galaxy S7 484
(Good)
2
(Excellent)
unmeasurable
(Excellent)
6852
(Excellent)
2.07
1.26
(Excellent)
2.09
(Good)

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